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Community Resource Guide: Step Up and Speak Out Guide

Step Up and Speak Out

Step Up and Speak Out Guide has informtaion about responding to distressed individuals, disruptive individuals, and to suicide risk. If you are concerned for your immediate safety or that of others call 330-704-2582 or 911

Distressed Students

DEALING WITH DISTRESSED INDIVIDUALS

You may be one of the first individuals to notice that something is wrong or that a person is distressed. Although emotional distress may be expected, especially during times of high stress, you may notice that a person is acting out of character or in ways that are inconsistent with typical behavior. Often, the person’s behavior may cause you to become upset or worried. You may be a resource in times of trouble, and your expression of interest and concern may be critical in helping the individual regain emotional stability. You may also be in a good position to use campus and community resources so that appropriate interventions can occur.

Emergeny Contact

 

IF YOU ARE CONCERNED FOR YOUR IMMEDIATE SAFETY OR THAT OF OTHERS, CALL 330-704-2582 OR 911.

 

Dealing with Disruptive Individuals

DEALING WITH DISRUPTIVE INDIVIDUALS

Any behavior that interferes with students, faculty or staff and their access to an appropriate and/or safe educational or work environment is considered disruptive. It is important to note that disruptive behavior as defined in this section may differ from classroom disruptions. Policy information regarding classroom disruptions can be found at www.tinyurl.com/cdfp3ud.

Additional Resources

Additional Resources

At Stark State College

Student Support Services - Elizabeth Inkinen-Juergensen // 330-494-6170, Ext. 4219 // ejuergensen@starkstate.edu

Campus Safety/Title IX Coordinator - Diana Tsenekos // 330-494-6170, Ext. 4424 // dtsenekos@starkstate.edu

mystarkstate - Employee tab // Behavioral Intervention Team folder

Responding to Suicide Risk - You can help

Responding to Suicide Risk: You can help!

It is a myth that asking someone about suicide actually creates suicidal thoughts. Talking to individuals about suicide does not increase their risk. Ask the question – Are you thinking of suicide?

or Are you considering harming or killing  yourself?

or Have things gotten so bad that you don’t care if you live or die?


24-Hour Resources

*If you are concerned about suicide risk:

call: 1-800-273-TALK or visit:  www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

*If you are concerned about a veteran:

call: 1-800-273-8255 or visit: www.veteranscrisisline.net

*If you are concerned about an LGBTQ  individual:

call: 1-866-488-7386 or visit: www.thetrevorproject.org

Distressed Students: The DOs and DON'Ts

Distressed Students

The DOs

  • DO trust your intuition.
  • DO speak with the individual privately and express your willingness to help in  a direct and nonjudgmental manner.
  • DO let the individual know you are concerned about the individual’s  welfare.
  • DO listen carefully to what the individual is upset about; actively   listen.
  • DO acknowledge the feelings of the individual; help explore  options.
  • DO point out that help is available and that seeking help is a sign of strength and courage, rather than weakness or failure.
  • DO suggest resources; make personal referrals when possible and call ahead to brief the person.
  • DO maintain clear and consistent boundaries and expectations; recognize your own limits.
  • DO call 911 if you are concerned for your immediate safety or that of others, or if the individual needs immediate  attention.
  • DO consult with an appropriate mental health resource if you are concerned for the individual but you are not concerned about any immediate danger (e.g., sexual assault, recent loss); see enclosed campus card for  resources.
  • DO refer an individual to an appropriate campus or community resource for support related to personal or academic issues. When in doubt, contact your supervisor or chair/director.

The DON’Ts

  • DON’T ignore the unusual behavior.
  • DON’T minimize the situation.
  • DON’T ignore warning signs about the individual’s safety or the safety of  others.
  • DON’T promise confidentiality.
  • DON’T judge or criticize.
  • DON’T make the problem your own.
  • DON’T involve yourself beyond the limits of your time, skill or emotional  well-being.

 

Disruptive Individuals - DOs and DON'Ts

DISRUPTIVE INDIVIDUALS

The DOs

  • DO call 911 if there is an immediate threat to the safety of   individuals.
  • DO actively listen to the person, through the  anger.
  • DO acknowledge the feelings of the  individual.
  • DO allow the person to vent and to tell you what is upsetting to him/her. Use the silence to allow the person to talk it  out.
  • DO set limits. Explain clearly and directly what behaviors are acceptable (e.g., “I will be willing to speak with you as long as you lower your voice”)   and not acceptable (e.g., “You have a right to be angry but breaking things is not OK”).
  • DO be firm, steady, direct and honest, but also  compassionate.
  • DO trust your intuition.
  • DO focus on what you can do to help resolve the   situation.
  • DO suggest resources (see enclosed campus card); make personal referrals when possible, and call ahead to brief the  person.
  • DO report the behavior to the leadership in your administrative unit or academic department.
  • DO consult with a campus resource (see enclosed campus card). If in doubt, contact your supervisor or  chair/director.

The DON’Ts

  • DON’T ignore the disruptive behavior.
  • DON’T interrupt, particularly during the first 20-30 seconds of peak  anger.
  • DON’T minimize the situation.
  • DON’T enter into an argument or shouting  match.
  • DON’T blame, ridicule or use sarcasm.
  • DON’T touch or become physical.
  • DON’T ignore your own limitations.

 

Responding to Suicide Risk: DOs and DON'T's

Responding to Suicide Risk

The DOs

  • DO trust your intuition.
  • DO call 911 if you are concerned for an individual’s immediate safety or if an individual needs immediate  attention.
  • DO stay calm.
  • DO take your time and be patient when responding to someone at   risk.
  • DO listen carefully to better understand the individual’s  concerns.
  • DO take concerns seriously.
  • DO offer hope, reasons to be hopeful, alternatives to the situation, resource information and information on how helpful treatment can   be.
  • DO urge the individual to accept professional support. Consider making a phone call to a mental health resource to connect the individual to appropriate services. Review your campus card for resources specific to your  location.

The DON’Ts

  • DON’T ignore the warning signs.
  • DON’T leave someone alone if there is a risk of  self-harm.
  • DON’T minimize the situation.
  • DON’T make the problem your own.
  • DON’T argue or try to change the individual’s  emotions.

Additional Resources

Additional Resources

At Stark State College

Student Support Services - Elizabeth Inkinen-Juergensen // 330-494-6170, Ext. 4219 // ejuergensen@starkstate.edu

Campus Safety/Title IX Coordinator - Diana Tsenekos // 330-494-6170, Ext. 4424 // dtsenekos@starkstate.edu

mystarkstate - Employee tab // Behavioral Intervention Team folder

Signs of Possible Distress

Signs of possible distress

  • Marked change in performance or  behavior
  • Excessive absence or tardiness
  • Trouble eating and/or sleeping
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Undue aggressiveness
  • Exaggerated emotional response that is disproportionate to the situation
  • Depressed or lethargic mood
  • Hyperactivity or very rapid speech
  • Marked change in personal  hygiene
  • Excessive confusion
  • Dramatic weight loss or gain
  • Dependency (e.g., individual spends an inordinate amount of time around you or makes excessive appointments to see you)
  • Behavior indicating loss of contact with  reality
  • Feelings of helplessness or hopelessness
  • References to suicide
  • References to homicide or assault
  • Isolation from friends, family or classmates
  • Giving away personal or prize possessions
  • Preparing for death by making a will and final arrangements

Disruptive Students - What steps should I take?

What steps should I take?

Disruptive behavior should not be ignored. It is important to remain calm. Remind yourself that the person is upset about the situation – not with you. Tell the person that such behavior is inappropriate and that there are consequences for failing to alter or improve the disruptive behavior. Many disruptive situations involve anger. Recognize that the period of peak anger usually lasts 20-30 seconds. Often it is best to wait out the initial outburst before addressing the individual. If you feel threatened, seek to remove yourself from  the situation or secure appropriate assistance.

Examples of disruptive  behavior

  • Behavior that draws inappropriate attention to  oneself
  • Verbal outbursts (e.g., arguing, yelling, screaming)
  • Words or actions that intimidate or harass others
  • Words or actions that cause others to fear for their personal safety
  • Threats of physical assault or violence

Warning Signs of Suicide Risk

Warning signs of suicide risk:

Talking or writing about death, dying or suicide.

Talking of feeling hopeless or having no reason to live.

Talking about feeling trapped or being in unbearable pain.

Talking about being a burden to others.

Threatening to hurt or kill oneself.

Seeking pills, weapons or other means to kill oneself.

Giving away personal or prized possessions.

Displaying extreme mood swings.

Taking risks/engaging in reckless behaviors.

Increasing use of alcohol and/or drugs.

Withdrawing from friends and family.

Having made previous suicide attempt(s).

The risk for suicide may be  greater:

Following a tragic event or loss.

If the individual increases use of alcohol or drugs.

If the individual behaves in a reckless or agitated manner.

If the individual identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning.

If the individual is a military veteran.

If the individual has experienced the loss of someone to suicide.

Resourses and Response Guide

Step up and speak out Campus resources

Step up and speak out response guide